News and Events

ABA Foundation Hosts Operation International Free Surgical Camp April 2018

Full of love and passion to what we do. We thank you Operation InternationalBetween April 5 and April 18, 2018, Operation International conducted their first Surgical and Medical Camp in Uganda on the invitation of ABA Foundation, during which Medical Teams spent considerable time training the Local Doctors and Nurses on modern aspects of Patient Care and Treatment. Operation International also donated equipment to upgrade the Operating Rooms, Recovery Rooms, and other areas of Patient Services at Rakai General Hospital.

Read more: ABA Foundation Hosts Operation...

VOLUNTEERING OPPORTUNITIES AT ABA FOUNDATION

MEDICAL MISSIONS OPPORTUNITIES AT ABA FOUNDATION

Uganda is a country slightly smaller than the state of Oregon, USA and is home to more than 35 million people. Uganda, while having a relatively stable government and substantial natural resources, is still a country with much suffering. The 44 year average life-span is evidence of the harsh social climate, alarming levels of Unemployment and Poverty, Diseases and Wars have taken the toll of the people of Uganda.

Uganda has been through several Humanitarian Crisis including Civil Conflict, Food Crisis, Floods, Land sliding, Refugee influx, Persistent Droughts, Human Trafficking, Absolute Poverty, HIV/AIDS Pandemic etc. This has left the people in Uganda in Great Need of Resources, including Medical Resources to help with the Major effects these Crises have had on the overall Health of the Nation.

By 2011, more than 1,500,000 children under the age of 14 had lost their parents to HIV / AIDS. Many others have lost their parents to war. Thousands live in tent cities and the situation in some parts of Uganda is considered to be one of the worst humanitarian emergencies in the world. With an estimated 54% of the population living at or below poverty line, and are desperate for our help! Please fill and return to us the Volunteer Registration Forms in the Downloads of the website.

 

VOLUNTEERS CHANGING THEIR WORLD FOR BETTER

ABA Foundation - Volunteers are making a difference in some of the world's poorest communities, living and working alongside local people on projects of lasting value.

Volunteers join us at different stages of their lives and with different passions. Yet they all want a challenge and they are united by their determination to make a difference. Typically, they walk away with a broad set of skills that help them to make progress in their personal and professional lives and carry on making a positive contribution to the causes they really care about.

These skills include the ability to negotiate, to motivate, to listen and learn from other cultures, to plan and manage budgets and so much more. Half the world is under 25. We know that with the right opportunity, young people have huge potential to make an impact in their communities. With ABA Foundation, you can be part of this experience too and show yourself and others what you're made of.



WHAT VOLUNTEERS DO AT ABA FOUNDATION?

Volunteer Projects includes:- Supporting local hospitals with Medical Teams, Operating Mobile Clinics, Conducting Voluntary Counseling and Testing in Schools and at Medical Centers, Volunteer builders to help in construction of houses for Elderly, Destitute Children, Disabled and other Needy Groups, Build water tanks, Wells, Toilets at Social Centers etc, Social Workers to support our Orphans, Elderly and Other Needy Groups, Evangelism, Training single Mothers and Widows – Tailoring, Weaving Art and Crafts, Carpentry and Joinery at our Vocational Training Center, Modern Agricultural Techniques, etc. Teacher Volunteers to support and teach in our local elementary Schools.

(Needy Groups refers to:- Destitute Children, Orphans, Street Kids, Abandoned Kids, Dumped on garbage kids, Unwanted kids, Widows, Disabled, Deaf, Blind, Mute, Widowers, Downtrodden, Elderly, HIV/ AIDS patients, Poor families affected by HIV/AIDS etc). Film maker Volunteers to help profile our Organization. Website Designers to help re-design to improve on the quality and standard of our organization’s websites. Volunteers help to sensitize local communities on the dangers of child sacrifice, Child Prostitution, and HIV / AIDS which is increasing in Uganda especially in Urban Centers. Volunteers work on the ongoing construction of our Children Rehabilitation Centers in Uganda.

"Non-Discrimination Policy"

Read more: VOLUNTEERING OPPORTUNITIES AT ABA...

ACCREDITING COUNCIL FOR THEOLOGICAL EDUCATION IN AFRICA

Beloved in Christ,

For your information, the mission of ACTEA is to promote quality evangelical theological education in Africa by providing supporting services, facilitating academic recognition, and fostering continental and intercontinental cooperation.

Accreditation of institutions, while an important aspect of our ministry; is only one facet of our broad scope of activities benefiting theological education. While over 125 institutions around the continent are related to ACTEA, only a minority of those are actually accredited.

As you may well know, accreditation is achieved by a school after a demanding process of rigorous self-examination and external verification in order to demonstrate achievement of standards which can be internationally recognized.

A school not yet prepared to meet the rigors of accreditation may still be formally linked to ACTEA to benefit from its non-accreditation and networking services as an "ACTEA Correspondent Member", and it is this category of relationship which I would recommend that you consider at this initial stage. In fact, Correspondent membership would be preliminary to any further discussions regarding accreditation.

As ACTEA does not have any documentation regarding your school, we will be grateful if you could send us some published information regarding your institution including a copy of the current prospectus. Upon receipt, I will send you additional information on ACTEA and how your school may be formally linked with us.

We look forward to hearing from you soon.

Sarah Fundulu
ACTEA Administrative Assistant
P.O. Box 250100
Ndola - Zambia

 

CHILD SACRIFICE IS INCREASING IN UGANDA

Child sacrifice is increasing among the Uganda Communities both rural and urban areas. Some cases have been reported to the authorities and its believed many other cases have passed unnoticed thus leading to not only severe suffering of innocent children but also death.

All the culprits who have been caught in this criminal acts claim that the innocent children are sacrificed for wealth in local shrines and at construction sites to appease the gods.
However, this is a barbaric, inhuman criminal act that has violated the rights of innocent children and traumatized the parents of these victims.

This act therefore, calls for total condemnation and a serious sensitization campaign where respect for child rights can be the main subject and how the public can be watchful for the culprits. Therefore, we are inviting friends and well-wishers to join hands with us to fight this increasing criminal act in Uganda.

ABA Foundation will be running supplements in the newspapers and television stations not only to condemn these inhuman acts of defilement and child sacrifice but also to educate the public on how to respect child rights. We appeal to everybody to financially support this noble cause. A friend in need is a friend indeed!

We thank our partners, friends, donors and well-wishers from the depth of our hearts for supporting this noble cause and for all your efforts to promote the objectives of ABA Foundation.

We are looking forward to continue working with you to fulfill the objectives of ABA Foundation.

NIV: James 1:27. “Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world”.

DONATION'S ESSENCE

 

ABA FOUNDATION LUNCHES ANTI-MALARIA AND MICRONUTRIENT DEFICIENCY DRIVE IN UGANDA:

The ABA Foundation has begun distributing Insecticide Treated Mosquito Nets, Vitamin A, Albendazole and other Deworming tablets to children below five (5) years and Pregnant Mothers countrywide.

The Mosquito Nets and the Vitamin Angels Micronutrient are being given to children under five, pregnant mothers and other vulnerable needy groups in Uganda.

Uganda is considered to have the highest rate of Malaria transmission in the region, with an average of 1,565 mosquito bites per person per year, the latest UNICEF report has revealed.

Surprisingly, some people have used the nets as wedding gowns instead of protecting themselves against the Anopheles Mosquito, a vector that carries Malaria!

Uganda’s Minister for health said “while other countries have been able to drastically reduce or eliminate cases of Malaria, 15 people die of the disease every hour”.

Each Malaria death represents a needless loss, an unacceptable loss, when we know they can be prevented. And in the fight against the disease, we are deploying our biggest weapons here!

We thank M/s. Vitamin Angels USA for supporting our work to help alleviate the micronutrient deficiency in Uganda.

 

CHILDREN’S REHABILITATION CENTER

The majority of the girls we have helped and turned away from prostitution face social stigma, family rejection, shame, fear of retribution and loss of future economic prospects.

So far, our organization is rehabilitating a big number of these girls. We are building for them a rehabilitation home/ center with vocational skills training for their future sustainability. It is a pity because most of the have contracted HIV/AIDS. We make it our duty to visit those on antiretroviral drugs often, to ensure that they do not default on dosage.

According to a recent report by the United Nations Children’s Fund, it was estimated that up to 35% of teenagers in some Ugandan Urban centers are involved in casual sex for cash. The report said poverty was the main reason the trade was thriving among young girls in Uganda. We really concur with UNICEF’s observation.

Another child prostitute, Barbara said that poverty drove her into the business. “Where else do you think I could get money for my bills, which include shs.35,000/= ($10) for rent, then food, hair makeup among others? God has called us to reach the needy and hurting people but we cannot do this work alone. Ecc.4:9–12.

Could it be that child prostitution in Uganda is suffering from the “bystander effect”? In 1960s, a young woman on the streets of New York City, in the United States of America was stabbed to death over a period of 30 minutes while as many as 40 witnesses did nothing; despite her pleas for help.  Psychologists explain it as the “bystander effect”. In the face of an emergency, a person is less likely to intervene when others are present. It’s our nature to assume that the next person will act, thus relinquishing responsibility.

This description sounds a lot like the international community’s response or lack thereof surrounding this situation in Africa. They adopted a wait and see approach as events unfold, yet when everyone expects the others to take action, no one will. The greatest British Politician Edmund Burke once said that the only thing necessary for evil to trump is for good men to do nothing!

 

VOLUNTARY COUNSELING AND TESTING SERVICES IN SCHOOLS

The increasing HIV/ HIDS prevalence among teenagers has prompted ABA Foundation to introduce mobile VCT (Voluntary Counseling and Testing) Services in primary and secondary schools, where children are counseled and then tested with the consent from their parents.

It is not easy to counsel young people compared to grownups. The stigma within them is real, and we think we need a special sensitization and awareness program targeting this particular age group to cub the vice.

Children need a chance in life, being born into the slums of Africa simply means absence; absence of toilets (60 of children in slums have no toilets or pit latrines), absence of clean drinking water (water costs money and is carried in jerry cans which often develop mold and mildew and often lack a closure), absence of proper hygiene due lack of water, absence of schooling due to lack of money in the family even though education in countries such as Uganda is free for primary education, it costs money for many other things (67% of girls drop out of primary school in Uganda and 38% of boys do the same.)

Life is simply hard for children since most families earn very little and in slums un-employment exceeds 78% or more, so parents or guardians have little money for the children, their education, clothing, shoes, housing, food, and much more.

These pages show both needs and results; take a look, stories that touch the heart and the pictures will speak volumes to you. They are not there to evoke pity in you but an empowering spirit of compassion that might make a difference in the life of a child.

 

ABA FOUNDATION DONATES BICYCLES TO LOCAL COUNCILS

The 70 bicycles, which were given to 47 Local Councils (LCs) and twenty two (22) to Women Rights’ Committees by ABA Foundation are aimed at Enhancing the Accessibility, Identification, Reporting and Responding to Cases of Child Abuse and Gender Based Violence in the Community.

Speaking during the ceremony, the Executive Director of ABA Foundation Dr. Joseph Kiyimba said the vice can only be curbed through a concerted effort and asked leaders to stop settling defilement cases outside courts of law.

“The challenge we have is that some leaders have lost commitment and responsibility in fighting social problems,” Dr. Joseph said.

MEDICAL MISSIONS OPPORTUNITIES

MEDICAL MISSIONS OPPORTUNITIES AT ABA FOUNDATION

Uganda is a country slightly smaller than the state of Oregon, USA and is home to about 40 million people. Uganda, while having a relatively stable government and substantial natural resources, is still a country with much suffering. The 44 year average life-span is evidence of the harsh social climate, alarming levels of Unemployment and Poverty, Diseases and Wars have taken the toll of the people of Uganda.

Uganda has been through several Humanitarian Crisis including Civil Conflict, Food Crisis, Floods, Land sliding, Refugee influx, Persistent Droughts, Human Trafficking, Absolute Poverty, HIV/AIDS Pandemic etc. This has left the people in Uganda in Great Need of Resources, including Medical Resources to help with the Major effects these Crises have had on the overall Health of the Nation.

By 2011, more than 1,500,000 children under the age of 14 had lost their parents to HIV / AIDS. Many others have lost their parents to war. Thousands live in tent cities and the situation in some parts of Uganda is considered to be one of the worst humanitarian emergencies in the world. With an estimated 54% of the population living at or below poverty line, according to a recent report by UNCEF.

Volunteering Opportunities at ABA Foundation

VOLUNTEERS CHANGING THEIR WORLD FOR BETTER

ABA Foundation - Volunteers are making a difference in some of the world's poorest communities, living and working alongside local people on projects of lasting value.


Volunteers join us at different stages of their lives and with different passions. Yet they all want a challenge and they are united by their determination to make a difference. Typically, they walk away with a broad set of skills that help them to make progress in their personal and professional lives and carry on making a positive contribution to the causes they really care about.


These skills include the ability to negotiate, to motivate, to listen and learn from other cultures, to plan and manage budgets and so much more. Half the world is under 25. We know that with the right opportunity, young people have huge potential to make an impact in their communities. With ABA Foundation, you can be part of this experience too and show yourself and others what you're made of.


WHAT VOLUNTEERS DO AT ABA FOUNDATION?

Volunteer Projects includes:- Supporting local hospitals with Medical Teams, Operating Mobile Clinics, Conducting Voluntary Counseling and Testing in Schools and at Medical Centers, Volunteer builders to help in construction of houses for Elderly, Destitute Children, Disabled and other Needy Groups, Build water tanks, Wells, Toilets at Social Centers etc, Social Workers to support our Orphans, Elderly and Other Needy Groups, Evangelism, Training single Mothers and Widows – Tailoring, Weaving Art and Crafts, Carpentry and Joinery at our Vocational Training Center, Modern Agricultural Techniques, etc. Teacher Volunteers to support and teach in our local elementary Schools.


(Needy Groups refers to:- Destitute Children, Orphans, Street Kids, Abandoned Kids, Dumped on garbage kids, Unwanted kids, Widows, Disabled, Deaf, Blind, Mute, Widowers, Downtrodden, Elderly, HIV/ AIDS patients, Poor families affected by HIV/AIDS etc). Film maker Volunteers to help profile our Organization. Website Designers to help re-design to improve on the quality and standard of our organization’s websites.


Volunteers help to sensitize local communities on the dangers of child sacrifice, Child Prostitution, and HIV / AIDS which is increasing in Uganda especially in Urban Centers. Volunteers work on the ongoing construction of our Children Rehabilitation Centers in Uganda.

The Christian Martyrs of Uganda

The arrival of the Christian missionaries, Anglican and Catholic, set the stage for new developments, and marked a turning point in the religious life of the people of Buganda; as well as the political structure of the kingdom and the region at large. The history of Buganda from this point on took a different turn. A social revolution that was to transform all aspects of people's lives had set in, and the events that followed, unpredictable as they were, added to the discomfort the new changes had brought about. The untimely death of Mutesa I in 1884 just a few years after the arrival of the missionaries, left the kingdom in the hands of Mwanga II, a youth whose ruling style fell far short of the charisma and political astuteness his late father had demonstrated in dealing with the foreigners.

Mutesa had the astuteness and maturity of dealing with conflicting forces that struggled to influence his court. The Arabs (the Moslems), the Catholics (the French or Bafaransa as they were locally called) or the Protestants (the English or Bangereza) operated, of course not without constraint, with some minimal success during his reign. He let his subjects of all ranks to join any creed of their choice. The Arabs also having seen the Christian missionaries' efforts to convert the local people also diligently started to teach Islam. There was a competitive struggle among the preachers of the new creeds each attempting to assert more influence and recognition among the most influential officials in the inner circle of the king's court. The king himself never committed to any single creed. The Moslems denounced him for his refusal to be circumcised, and he could not be baptized in the Christian denominations because he did not want to give up polygamy. He died still a traditionalist.

The Christian religion was received with much excitement by the converts but it came with its own requirements. It denounced all the native religious behavior and practices as heathen and satanic. Therefore joining it meant a commitment to break away from the old life style, make and adopt new alliances, and adjust to new moral and religious standards, adherence and allegiance. The new flocks of believers (abasomi, or readers, as they were called) therefore, were seemingly regarded as 'rebels' who had transferred their loyalty to new religious systems thus abandoning the old tribal traditions.

Although Mwanga had shown some love for the missionaries as a young prince, his attitude changed when he became king. The once lively and enthusiastic prince in support of the missionaries turned into an intolerant and vicious persecutor of Christians and all foreigners. He felt, with good cause, that the powers and authority his predecessors had enjoyed were dwindling, and had disintegrated under the influence of the missionaries and their converts. The converts had diverted their loyalty to some other authority and their allegiance at all costs could no longer be counted on. For Mwanga, the ultimate humiliation was the insolence he received from the pages when they ( the least subservient of servants) resisted his homosexual advances. According to old tradition the king was the center of power and authority, and he could dispense with any life as he felt, hence the old saying Namunswa alya kunswaze (the queen ant feeds on her subjects). Although homosexuality is abhorred among the Baganda, it was unheard of for mere pages to reject the wishes of a king. (It is alleged that Mwanga learnt or acquired homosexual behavior from the Arabs). Given those conflicting values Mwanga was determined to rid his kingdom of the new teaching and its followers.

It was hardly a year after Mwanga's assumption of the throne that he ordered the execution of Yusufu (Joseph) Rugarama, Makko (Mark) Kakumba, and Nuwa (Noah) Serwanga the first three Christian martyrs, who were killed at Busega Natete on January 31, 1885. In October of 1885 the Anglican Bishop James Hannington recently dispatched to head the Eastern Equatorial Africa, headquartered in Buganda, was murdered in Busoga on his way to Buganda. Mwanga had ordered his death. Hannington's crime was to attempt to come to Buganda through Busoga, a shorter route than that employed by earlier visitors who took the route from south of lake Victoria. Buganda's kings regarded Busoga as a backdoor to Buganda and thought that any one coming through the backdoor must have evil intentions towards the kingdom.

Joseph Mukasa Balikuddembe, a senior advisor to the king and a Catholic convert, condemned Mwanga for ordering Hannington's death without giving him (Hannington) a chance to defend himself as was customary. Mwanga was annoyed that Mukasa would question his actions, and he had him arrested and killed. On Nov. 15 1885; Mukasa became the first Catholic martyr, when he was beheaded at Nakivubo. Between December of 1885 and May of 1886 many more converts were wantonly murdered. Mwanga precipitated a showdown in May by ordering the converts to choose between their new faith, and complete obedience to his orders. Those unwilling to renounce their new faith would be subject to death. Courageously, the neophytes chose their faith. The execution of twenty six Christians at Namugongo on June 3, 1886; was the climax of the campaign against the converts. The last person killed in this crusade, was Jean-Marie Muzeeyi, who was beheaded at Mengo on Jan 27, 1887. The complete list of the known martyrs is given below. The list of forty five known Catholic and Protestant martyrs includes only those who could be formally accounted for, many more murders went unreported and without a record.

Child Abuse Takes New Dimensions

Nakatekere was born lame and cannot stand. But this was not something to worry about before her mother’s death in 2006. Until now, she has no one to provide for her the necessities.

It’s not a busy stage at Namataba just a few meters away from Mukono District town where you alight from on a bus headed to Jinja. As you move deep to Nagojje Sub-county, you wonder about the souls that enjoy the cool breeze that welcomes you from Mabira forest.

But there lies Jane Nakatekere, a 14-year-old girl, who according to Ms Maimuna Mugambe, the Nagojje Community Care chairperson, has been neglected for the jiggers to feast on.

VCT SERVICES IN SCHOOL

The increasing HIV prevalence among teenagers has prompted ABA Foundation to introduce mobile VCT Services in primary schools, where children are counseled and then tested with the consent from their parents.

It is not easy to counsel young people compared to grown ups. The stigma within them is real, and we think we need a special sensitization and awareness program targeting this particular age group.

We are currently caring for a big number of orphans in the region and entirely depend on donations from friends and well wishers. You too can be a blessing to God’s People by supporting projects of ABA Foundation.

The 4th Graduation Ceremony

ABA FOUNDATION BIBLE COLLEGE

4th Graduation Ceremony Speech

By

Director/ Principal

Rev. Kiyimba Joseph

Click Here to View the Video

Our guest of honor, special guests, invited guests, graduands, ladies and gentlemen.

We warmly welcome you to this 3rd graduation ceremony of our college.
ABA Foundation Bible College is a school to equip believers with the word of God. The school is serving the whole body of Christ.

ABA Foundation Bible College is registered with the International Association of Bible Institutes (IABI) USA and affiliated with the International Victory Bible Institutes (IVBI), U.S.A.

ABA Foundation Bible College is classified by Africa International Missions (AIM), South Africa. Our instructors are qualified men and women of God from Uganda and Overseas.

The goal of ABA Foundation Bible College is to equip the saints unto the work of ministering the word of God to others. The goal of our students must be the same. The vision of ABA Foundation Bible College is to give Christians a Foundation of the word of God, to prepare them to do the work of the Ministry and to train those called to full – time ministry.

We offer certificates, Diplomas, Bachelor’s Degrees, Masters Degrees and Doctorate Degrees that are awarded under the name of International Association of Bible Institutes (IABI), USA. We are strongly focused on our goal. The goal is not to hand out awards, but to disciple God’s people for preaching and teaching the word of God.

It is our goal to have supplied a student at the time of graduation with a Bachelors Degree in Theology enough material that will be his/her resource for preaching and teaching for many years to come. Graduated students leave with a vast library of materials they can use in their future ministry.

Ladies and Gentlemen, education is the means by which freedom, democracy and economic growth are maintained in any society.

President Yoweri Museveni one day said, I quote “An uneducated society can never enjoy the freedom of constitutional democracy” I close the quotes.

It is our desire to encourage freedom and success of our students by offering them an opportunity to study a course that will produce upliftment in their lives. It is our goal that an educational contribution is made toward the betterment of our society. We aim to train a generation of citizens who are assets to the communities in which they live. Our students are equipped with valuable life changing skills in order to make them successful members of their communities and productive citizens of their respective countries.

President Nelson Mandela once said, I quote, “The difference between Olympians and the rest of us is that Olympians behave as longtime friends who occasionally compete, while we behave as longtime adversaries who occasionally get along” I close the quotes.

This course will help students have a greater relationship with others in their respective communities through the life skills they have learnt.

Dear graduands, the key to a better future depends on you; not the circumstances in which you presently live. Our challenge to you is that you first learn the skills that will enhance your life. We then challenge you to put into action the skills that you have learnt. If you both learn and apply what is taught in this course, you will enjoy a more exciting and successful life. God gives every bird its own food, but he does not throw it in the nests. You were born to success and not to fail; but without sacrifice of hard work, one can never succeed!

We convey our gratitude to your parents, relatives, sponsors, benefactors, and well – wishers who sacrificed their earnings, time, wisdom and care to make you what you are today.

We urge you graduands to continue conducting yourself in a mature and well considered and well thought out ways and at all times demonstrate a passion of servant hood, helping to find solutions to society’s problems and being the example others want to emulate but not despise, ostracize, or demean. The journey you are embarking on is continuing to be humble, of service to others and building yourself.

We are within the city conurbation and, as is typical of all cities; there are very good things and very bad things; there are some very good people and a lot of extremely bad people; there are people who can come to your help and those who will eagerly want to destroy you - so be careful!

By the way, Health is the state of being well and free from illness in body and mind.

Security is freedom or protection from danger or worry. Avoid security risks – people who may be danger to you because of their habits. Safety is the state of being protected from danger and harm.

Dress decently at all times to convince people to have confidence in you. Dressing style can make people conclude whether to take you seriously or not, whether to tease you or not, whether to respect you or not.

Finally, we would like to thank all those who are working with us to train those students that God brings to our Bible College. Special thanks to Africa International Missions (AIM) South Africa, International Association of Bible Institutes (IABI), USA. Our long time friend Dr. Roger Dickson of Cape Town, South Africa, International Victory Bible Institutes (IVBI) USA and our great friend, Bishop Dr. Derek Prince of USA. They have strongly supported us with study materials to train our students and we thank all of them from the depth of our hearts.

We also extend our heart felt thanks to our graduating don, Bishop Dr. Josephat Kitheka from United Kingdom for accepting the responsibility we entrusted upon him.

Registration for new students is in progress. We encourage everybody especially church leaders to study with us. I have invited two missionaries from U.S.A to train our students who need help to read, write and understand English. These are doctors of English with great experience in teaching English as second language to people in developing countries - so get prepared.

I have said all this For God and My Country. Thank you so much for your attention.

…………………………

Dr.  Kiyimba Joseph

www.abafoundationafrica.org/

Director / Principal.

ABA Foundation Lunches Anti-Malaria Drive

The ABA Foundation has begun distributing insecticide treated mosquito nets to people in IDP Camps.

The nets are being given to children under five, pregnant mothers and other vulnerable groups.

Uganda is considered to have the highest rate of Malaria transmission in the region, with an average of 1,565 mosquito bites per person per year, the latest UNICEF report has revealed.

Surprisingly, some people have used the nets as wedding gowns instead of protecting themselves against the Anopheles mosquito, a vector that carries Malaria!

Uganda’s Minister for health said “while other countries have been able to drastically reduce or eliminate cases of Malaria, 15 people die of the disease every hour”.

Each Malaria death represents a needless loss, an unacceptable loss, when we know they can be prevented. And in the fight against the disease, we are deploying our biggest weapons here.

We pray that God will enable you to stand with us in support of this noble work that we are doing. We believe that together we can make a difference in Africa. Luke 1:37.

Kiyimba Elijaha Jubilee – Died Mysteriously On July 15, 2013

Kiyimba Elisha JubileeMy Son – Kiyimba Elijah Jubilee is dead! The about two years old Kiyimba Elijah Jubilee has mysteriously passed on today Monday July 15, 2013 at the National Referral Hospital.

He had general body weakness for two days. Doctors tried their best to save the life of my beloved son Kiyimba Elijah Jubilee but in vain. He temporarily responded to the treatment but later in the day, his condition worsened and died on supportive machines at around 4:00 pm, as doctors struggled to save his life.

The burial of late Kiyimba Elijah Jubilee shall take place tomorrow Tuesday July 16, 2013 at 2:00pm at our ancestral burial ground at Konko ‘A’ Village, Mbiko – Wakisi Sub County in Buikwe District, 68Km on the Kampala – Jinja High Way.

We praise God for the time and events we shared with Elijah.  2nd Timothy 4:7 “I have fought a good fight, I have finished the race and I have kept the faith”. Elijah - In God’s hand you rest, in our hearts you will forever remain.

FREE SURGICAL AND MEDICAL CAMPS IN UGANDA!

The Operation International, USA, Medical Professionals will be conducting Surgical and Medical camps in the months of February, April, June, August and October of every year in Uganda to help with Patient Care, and to Further Train the Local Healthcare Providers.

The Mission will include treating poor adults and children patients with complex surgical pathology. The medical teams will also provide supplies to vulnerable orphans and destitute children, and other needy groups in different places in Uganda.

Operation International is dedicated to saving lives and improving health care by providing free medical health care for those in need in underserved communities, and teach and train the local doctors and nurses on modern aspects of Patient Care and treatment.

DAY OF AFRICAN CHILD

Today June 16 – The ABA Foundation has commemorated the Day of the African Child. On June 16, 1976, about ten thousand black school children took to the streets of Soweto, South Africa. In a march more than half a mile long, they protested the inferior quality of their education and demanded their right to be taught in their own language. Hundreds of young boys and girls were shot down and killed by security forces. In the two weeks of protest that followed, more than a hundred people were killed and more than a thousand were injured.

To honor the memory of those killed and the courage of all those who marched, the Day of the African Child has been celebrated on 16 June every year since 1991, when it was first initiated by the Organization of African Unity (now the African Union). It honors those who participated in the Soweto Uprising in 1976. It also raises awareness of the continuing need for improvement of the education provided to the African children.

On June 16th every year, ABA Foundation, Governments, NGOs, International Organizations and other Stakeholders gather to discuss the challenges and opportunities facing the full realization of the rights of children in Africa. For this year, the theme chosen returns to the roots of the movement: A child-friendly, quality, free, and compulsory education for all children in Africa!

Volunteering Opportunities at ABA Foundation

VOLUNTEERS CHANGING THEIR WORLD FOR BETTER

ABA Foundation - Volunteers are making a difference in some of the world's poorest communities, living and working alongside local people on projects of lasting value.


Volunteers join us at different stages of their lives and with different passions. Yet they all want a challenge and they are united by their determination to make a difference. Typically, they walk away with a broad set of skills that help them to make progress in their personal and professional lives and carry on making a positive contribution to the causes they really care about.


These skills include the ability to negotiate, to motivate, to listen and learn from other cultures, to plan and manage budgets and so much more. Half the world is under 25. We know that with the right opportunity, young people have huge potential to make an impact in their communities. With ABA Foundation, you can be part of this experience too and show yourself and others what you're made of.


WHAT VOLUNTEERS DO AT ABA FOUNDATION?

Volunteer Projects includes:- Supporting local hospitals with Medical Teams, Operating Mobile Clinics, Conducting Voluntary Counseling and Testing in Schools and at Medical Centers, Volunteer builders to help in construction of houses for Elderly, Destitute Children, Disabled and other Needy Groups, Build water tanks, Wells, Toilets at Social Centers etc, Social Workers to support our Orphans, Elderly and Other Needy Groups, Evangelism, Training single Mothers and Widows – Tailoring, Weaving Art and Crafts, Carpentry and Joinery at our Vocational Training Center, Modern Agricultural Techniques, etc. Teacher Volunteers to support and teach in our local elementary Schools.


(Needy Groups refers to:- Destitute Children, Orphans, Street Kids, Abandoned Kids, Dumped on garbage kids, Unwanted kids, Widows, Disabled, Deaf, Blind, Mute, Widowers, Downtrodden, Elderly, HIV/ AIDS patients, Poor families affected by HIV/AIDS etc). Film maker Volunteers to help profile our Organization. Website Designers to help re-design to improve on the quality and standard of our organization’s websites.


Volunteers help to sensitize local communities on the dangers of child sacrifice, Child Prostitution, and HIV / AIDS which is increasing in Uganda especially in Urban Centers. Volunteers work on the ongoing construction of our Children Rehabilitation Centers in Uganda.

EARTH DAY - April 22

EARTH DAY - APRIL 22

Founded in 1970 as a day of education about environmental issues, Earth Day is now a globally celebrated holiday that is sometimes extended into Earth Week, a full seven days of events focused on green awareness. The brainchild of Senator Gaylord Nelson and inspired by the antiwar protests of the late 1960s, Earth Day was originally aimed at creating a mass environmental movement. It began as a “national teach-in on the environment” and was held on April 22 to maximize the number of students that could be reached on university campuses. By raising public awareness of air and water pollution, Nelson hoped to bring environmental causes into the national spotlight.

By the early 1960s Americans were becoming aware of the effects of pollution on the environment. Rachel Carson’s 1962 bestseller “Silent Spring” raised the specter of the dangerous effects of pesticides on America’s country sides. Later in the decade, a 1969 fire on Cleveland’s Cuyahoga River shed light on the problem of chemical waste disposal. Until that time, protecting the planet’s natural resources was not part of the national political agenda, and the number of activists devoted to large-scale issues such as industrial pollution was minimal. Factories pumped pollutants into the air, lakes and rivers with few legal consequences. Big, gas-guzzling cars were considered a sign of prosperity. Only a small portion of the American population was familiar with–let alone practiced–recycling.

A highlight of the United Nations' Earth Day celebration in New York City is the ringing of the Peace Bell, a gift from Japan, at the exact moment of the vernal equinox.

Elected to the U.S. Senate in 1962, Senator Gaylord Nelson, a Democrat fromWisconsin, was determined to convince the federal government that the planet was at risk. In 1969, Nelson, considered one of the leaders of the modern environmental movement, developed the idea for Earth Day after being inspired by the anti-Vietnam War “teach-ins” that were taking place on college campuses around the United States. According to Nelson, he envisioned a large-scale, grassroots environmental demonstration “to shake up the political establishment and force this issue onto the national agenda.”

Nelson announced the Earth Day concept at a conference in Seattle in the fall of 1969 and invited the entire nation to get involved. He later recalled, “The wire services carried the story from coast to coast. The response was electric. It took off like gangbusters. Telegrams, letters and telephone inquiries poured in from all across the country. The American people finally had a forum to express its concern about what was happening to the land, rivers, lakes and air—and they did so with spectacular exuberance.” Dennis Hayes, a young activist who had served as student president at Stanford University, was selected as Earth Day’s national coordinator, and he worked with an army of student volunteers and several staff members from Nelson’s Senate office to organize the project. According to Nelson, “Earth Day worked because of the spontaneous response at the grassroots level. We had neither the time nor resources to organize 20 million demonstrators and the thousands of schools and local communities that participated. That was the remarkable thing about Earth Day. It organized itself.”

On April 22, rallies were held in Philadelphia, Chicago, Los Angeles and most other American cities, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. In New York City, Mayor John Lindsay closed off a portion of Fifth Avenue to traffic for several hours and spoke at a rally in Union Square with actors Paul Newman and Ali McGraw. In Washington, D.C., thousands of people listened to speeches and performances by singer Pete Seeger and others, and Congress went into recess so its members could speak to their constituents at Earth Day events.

The first Earth Day was effective at raising awareness about environmental issues and transforming public attitudes. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, “Public opinion polls indicate that a permanent change in national priorities followed Earth Day 1970. When polled in May 1971, 25 percent of the U.S. public declared protecting the environment to be an important goal, a 2,500 percent increase over 1969.” Earth Day kicked off the “Environmental decade with a bang,” as Senator Nelson later put it. During the 1970s, a number of important pieces of environmental legislation were passed, among them the Clean Air Act, the Water Quality Improvement Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Toxic Substances Control Act and the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. Another key development was the establishment in December 1970 of the Environmental Protection Agency, which was tasked with protecting human health and safeguarding the natural environment—air, water and land.

Since 1970, Earth Day celebrations have grown. In 1990, Earth Day went global, with 200 million people in over 140 nations participating, according to the Earth Day Network (EDN), a nonprofit organization that coordinates Earth Day activities. In 2000, Earth Day focused on clean energy and involved hundreds of millions of people in 184 countries and 5,000 environmental groups, according to EDN. Activities ranged from a traveling, talking drum chain in Gabon, Africa, to a gathering of hundreds of thousands of people at the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Today, the Earth Day Network collaborates with more than 17,000 partners and organizations in 174 countries. According to EDN, more than 1 billion people are involved in Earth Day activities, making it “the largest secular civic event in the world.

EARTH DAY CELEBRATIONS - ABA FOUNDATION!

The first Earth Day – April 22, 1970 – marked the beginning of the modern environmental movement. Approximately 20 million Americans, especially on college campuses, participated in a national teach-in on environmental issues and protests against environmental deterioration on the first Earth Day.

  • Cycling is environmentally friendly as the mode of transport is silent and produces no emissions. By contrast, motorized transport is noisy, while its emissions reduce air quality and add to the “greenhouse” gases contributing to global warming.
  • Cycling can also reduce congestion and the journey times of other road users, particularly in urban areas. Businesses may be unwilling to be based in an area constantly beset by traffic congestion which can cause delivery and health problems and result in a negative effect on the local economy.
  • When compared with previous studies, the TRL research found that, “avoiding stress and congestion, rather than getting physical exercise and saving money, now appear to be more important factors”, as to why people take up cycling.

YALI Event pictures of face book.

URL:  https://www.facebook.com/events/765347096898160/

YALI Earth Day Pictures with story:

URL: https://www.facebook.com/groups/yalinetwork/permalink/988977037850004/?pnref=story

ABOUT WORLD AIDS DAY

ABOUT WORLD AIDS DAY

WHAT IS WORLD AIDS DAY?

World AIDS Day is held on the 1st December each year and is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, show their support for people living with HIV and to commemorate people who have died. World AIDS Day was the first ever global health day, held for the first time in 1988.

HIV/AIDS is a development issue and security crisis globally and at country levels. There is need to intensify the response underpinned by evidence on the dynamics of the epidemic in different contexts and the effectiveness of employed approaches and interventions. Uganda's response to HIV/AIDS has generated a wealth of information and knowledge.

We provide tools for promoting sharing of information and learning from experiences, as well as information on the status and trends of the epidemic in the country, highlight challenges and proposals for the way forward to addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic at the community, district and national levels.

We Provide the Coordination, Monitoring and Evaluation of the HIV/AIDS related activities in the country in order to harmonize response to HIV/AIDS and its effects. ABA Foundation is expected to provide some leadership by ensuring effective harmonization of the HIV/AIDS related activities of the various players within agreed policy and program parameters.

Uganda is often held up as a model for Africa in the fight against HIV and AIDS. Strong government leadership, broad-based partnerships and effective public education campaigns all contributed to a decline in the number of people living with HIV/AIDS in the 1990s But the number has tripled from 6%

Although there is a lot to learn from Uganda’s comprehensive and timely campaign against the AIDS epidemic, emphasizing Uganda’s success story must not detract us from the devastating consequences that AIDS continues to have across the country: personally, socially and economically.

There are an estimated three million people living with HIV in Uganda, which includes 300,000 children.  An estimated 65,000 people died from AIDS in 2014 and about two million children have been orphaned by Uganda's devastating epidemic.

AIDS has had a devastating impact on Uganda. It has killed approximately six million people, and significantly reduced life expectancy. AIDS has depleted the country’s labor force, reduced agricultural output and food security. It has weakened educational and health services. The large number of AIDS related deaths amongst young adults has left behind about two million orphaned children.

People living with HIV and AIDS in Uganda not only face difficulties related to treatment and management of the disease, but they also have to deal with AIDS related stigma and discrimination. Stigma and discrimination towards those infected and affected by AIDS are visible at all levels of society from families and local communities to the government. Ugandan president Gen. Yoweri Museveni himself supported the policy of dismissing or not promoting members of the armed forces who test HIV positive, and in 2006 he suggested that a rival presidential candidate Col. Dr. Kizza Besigye was unsuitable for office obecause he was allegedly infected with the virus. Discrimination has also been reported in the private sector, including mandatory HIV testing for new employees. As well as hurting those affected, such attitudes are a major hindrance to prevention and treatment efforts.

The current HIV prevalence in Uganda is estimated at about 16.4% among adults and 1.7% among children. HIV prevalence is higher in urban areas (20% prevalence) than rural areas (12%). Perhaps as a result of earlier prevention programs targeting young, single adults, the number of new HIV infections among those in monogamous relationships is now significantly higher than those with multiple partners (63 percent compared to 24 percent in 2009).

Women are disproportionately affected, accounting for 67% of all adults living with HIV. Ugandan women tend to marry and become sexually active at a younger age than their male counterparts, and often have older and more sexually experienced partners. This (plus various biological and social factors) puts young women at greater risk of infection.

The number of new infections (an estimated 222,000 in 2013) exceeds the number of annual AIDS deaths (estimate of 72,000 in 2013), and it is feared that HIV prevalence in Uganda is rapidly rising again. There are many theories as to why this is happening, including the government’s shift towards abstinence-only prevention programs, and a general complacency of ‘AIDS-fatigue’. It has been suggested that antiretroviral drugs have changed the perception of AIDS from a death sentence to a treatable, manageable disease; this has greatly reduced the fear surrounding HIV, and led to a great increase of AIDS.

 

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ABA Foundation

The objectives of ABA Foundation is Helping People Live Better Life and to Promote the Socio - Economic Welfare of the Vulnerable Communities especially the Destitute Children, Orphans, Widows, Disaster Affected People and Poor Families affected by HIV / AIDS among others.

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