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DAY OF AFRICAN CHILD

Today June 16 – The ABA Foundation has commemorated the Day of the African Child. On June 16, 1976, about ten thousand black school children took to the streets of Soweto, South Africa. In a march more than half a mile long, they protested the inferior quality of their education and demanded their right to be taught in their own language. Hundreds of young boys and girls were shot down and killed by security forces. In the two weeks of protest that followed, more than a hundred people were killed and more than a thousand were injured.

To honor the memory of those killed and the courage of all those who marched, the Day of the African Child has been celebrated on 16 June every year since 1991, when it was first initiated by the Organization of African Unity (now the African Union). It honors those who participated in the Soweto Uprising in 1976. It also raises awareness of the continuing need for improvement of the education provided to the African children.

On June 16th every year, ABA Foundation, Governments, NGOs, International Organizations and other Stakeholders gather to discuss the challenges and opportunities facing the full realization of the rights of children in Africa. For this year, the theme chosen returns to the roots of the movement: A child-friendly, quality, free, and compulsory education for all children in Africa!

Volunteering Opportunities at ABA Foundation

VOLUNTEERS CHANGING THEIR WORLD FOR BETTER

ABA Foundation - Volunteers are making a difference in some of the world's poorest communities, living and working alongside local people on projects of lasting value.


Volunteers join us at different stages of their lives and with different passions. Yet they all want a challenge and they are united by their determination to make a difference. Typically, they walk away with a broad set of skills that help them to make progress in their personal and professional lives and carry on making a positive contribution to the causes they really care about.


These skills include the ability to negotiate, to motivate, to listen and learn from other cultures, to plan and manage budgets and so much more. Half the world is under 25. We know that with the right opportunity, young people have huge potential to make an impact in their communities. With ABA Foundation, you can be part of this experience too and show yourself and others what you're made of.


WHAT VOLUNTEERS DO AT ABA FOUNDATION?

Volunteer Projects includes:- Supporting local hospitals with Medical Teams, Operating Mobile Clinics, Conducting Voluntary Counseling and Testing in Schools and at Medical Centers, Volunteer builders to help in construction of houses for Elderly, Destitute Children, Disabled and other Needy Groups, Build water tanks, Wells, Toilets at Social Centers etc, Social Workers to support our Orphans, Elderly and Other Needy Groups, Evangelism, Training single Mothers and Widows – Tailoring, Weaving Art and Crafts, Carpentry and Joinery at our Vocational Training Center, Modern Agricultural Techniques, etc. Teacher Volunteers to support and teach in our local elementary Schools.


(Needy Groups refers to:- Destitute Children, Orphans, Street Kids, Abandoned Kids, Dumped on garbage kids, Unwanted kids, Widows, Disabled, Deaf, Blind, Mute, Widowers, Downtrodden, Elderly, HIV/ AIDS patients, Poor families affected by HIV/AIDS etc). Film maker Volunteers to help profile our Organization. Website Designers to help re-design to improve on the quality and standard of our organization’s websites.


Volunteers help to sensitize local communities on the dangers of child sacrifice, Child Prostitution, and HIV / AIDS which is increasing in Uganda especially in Urban Centers. Volunteers work on the ongoing construction of our Children Rehabilitation Centers in Uganda.

EARTH DAY - April 22

EARTH DAY - APRIL 22

Founded in 1970 as a day of education about environmental issues, Earth Day is now a globally celebrated holiday that is sometimes extended into Earth Week, a full seven days of events focused on green awareness. The brainchild of Senator Gaylord Nelson and inspired by the antiwar protests of the late 1960s, Earth Day was originally aimed at creating a mass environmental movement. It began as a “national teach-in on the environment” and was held on April 22 to maximize the number of students that could be reached on university campuses. By raising public awareness of air and water pollution, Nelson hoped to bring environmental causes into the national spotlight.

By the early 1960s Americans were becoming aware of the effects of pollution on the environment. Rachel Carson’s 1962 bestseller “Silent Spring” raised the specter of the dangerous effects of pesticides on America’s country sides. Later in the decade, a 1969 fire on Cleveland’s Cuyahoga River shed light on the problem of chemical waste disposal. Until that time, protecting the planet’s natural resources was not part of the national political agenda, and the number of activists devoted to large-scale issues such as industrial pollution was minimal. Factories pumped pollutants into the air, lakes and rivers with few legal consequences. Big, gas-guzzling cars were considered a sign of prosperity. Only a small portion of the American population was familiar with–let alone practiced–recycling.

A highlight of the United Nations' Earth Day celebration in New York City is the ringing of the Peace Bell, a gift from Japan, at the exact moment of the vernal equinox.

Elected to the U.S. Senate in 1962, Senator Gaylord Nelson, a Democrat fromWisconsin, was determined to convince the federal government that the planet was at risk. In 1969, Nelson, considered one of the leaders of the modern environmental movement, developed the idea for Earth Day after being inspired by the anti-Vietnam War “teach-ins” that were taking place on college campuses around the United States. According to Nelson, he envisioned a large-scale, grassroots environmental demonstration “to shake up the political establishment and force this issue onto the national agenda.”

Nelson announced the Earth Day concept at a conference in Seattle in the fall of 1969 and invited the entire nation to get involved. He later recalled, “The wire services carried the story from coast to coast. The response was electric. It took off like gangbusters. Telegrams, letters and telephone inquiries poured in from all across the country. The American people finally had a forum to express its concern about what was happening to the land, rivers, lakes and air—and they did so with spectacular exuberance.” Dennis Hayes, a young activist who had served as student president at Stanford University, was selected as Earth Day’s national coordinator, and he worked with an army of student volunteers and several staff members from Nelson’s Senate office to organize the project. According to Nelson, “Earth Day worked because of the spontaneous response at the grassroots level. We had neither the time nor resources to organize 20 million demonstrators and the thousands of schools and local communities that participated. That was the remarkable thing about Earth Day. It organized itself.”

On April 22, rallies were held in Philadelphia, Chicago, Los Angeles and most other American cities, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. In New York City, Mayor John Lindsay closed off a portion of Fifth Avenue to traffic for several hours and spoke at a rally in Union Square with actors Paul Newman and Ali McGraw. In Washington, D.C., thousands of people listened to speeches and performances by singer Pete Seeger and others, and Congress went into recess so its members could speak to their constituents at Earth Day events.

The first Earth Day was effective at raising awareness about environmental issues and transforming public attitudes. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, “Public opinion polls indicate that a permanent change in national priorities followed Earth Day 1970. When polled in May 1971, 25 percent of the U.S. public declared protecting the environment to be an important goal, a 2,500 percent increase over 1969.” Earth Day kicked off the “Environmental decade with a bang,” as Senator Nelson later put it. During the 1970s, a number of important pieces of environmental legislation were passed, among them the Clean Air Act, the Water Quality Improvement Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Toxic Substances Control Act and the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. Another key development was the establishment in December 1970 of the Environmental Protection Agency, which was tasked with protecting human health and safeguarding the natural environment—air, water and land.

Since 1970, Earth Day celebrations have grown. In 1990, Earth Day went global, with 200 million people in over 140 nations participating, according to the Earth Day Network (EDN), a nonprofit organization that coordinates Earth Day activities. In 2000, Earth Day focused on clean energy and involved hundreds of millions of people in 184 countries and 5,000 environmental groups, according to EDN. Activities ranged from a traveling, talking drum chain in Gabon, Africa, to a gathering of hundreds of thousands of people at the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Today, the Earth Day Network collaborates with more than 17,000 partners and organizations in 174 countries. According to EDN, more than 1 billion people are involved in Earth Day activities, making it “the largest secular civic event in the world.

EARTH DAY CELEBRATIONS - ABA FOUNDATION!

The first Earth Day – April 22, 1970 – marked the beginning of the modern environmental movement. Approximately 20 million Americans, especially on college campuses, participated in a national teach-in on environmental issues and protests against environmental deterioration on the first Earth Day.

  • Cycling is environmentally friendly as the mode of transport is silent and produces no emissions. By contrast, motorized transport is noisy, while its emissions reduce air quality and add to the “greenhouse” gases contributing to global warming.
  • Cycling can also reduce congestion and the journey times of other road users, particularly in urban areas. Businesses may be unwilling to be based in an area constantly beset by traffic congestion which can cause delivery and health problems and result in a negative effect on the local economy.
  • When compared with previous studies, the TRL research found that, “avoiding stress and congestion, rather than getting physical exercise and saving money, now appear to be more important factors”, as to why people take up cycling.

YALI Event pictures of face book.

URL:  https://www.facebook.com/events/765347096898160/

YALI Earth Day Pictures with story:

URL: https://www.facebook.com/groups/yalinetwork/permalink/988977037850004/?pnref=story

ABOUT WORLD AIDS DAY

ABOUT WORLD AIDS DAY

WHAT IS WORLD AIDS DAY?

World AIDS Day is held on the 1st December each year and is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, show their support for people living with HIV and to commemorate people who have died. World AIDS Day was the first ever global health day, held for the first time in 1988.

HIV/AIDS is a development issue and security crisis globally and at country levels. There is need to intensify the response underpinned by evidence on the dynamics of the epidemic in different contexts and the effectiveness of employed approaches and interventions. Uganda's response to HIV/AIDS has generated a wealth of information and knowledge.

We provide tools for promoting sharing of information and learning from experiences, as well as information on the status and trends of the epidemic in the country, highlight challenges and proposals for the way forward to addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic at the community, district and national levels.

We Provide the Coordination, Monitoring and Evaluation of the HIV/AIDS related activities in the country in order to harmonize response to HIV/AIDS and its effects. ABA Foundation is expected to provide some leadership by ensuring effective harmonization of the HIV/AIDS related activities of the various players within agreed policy and program parameters.

Uganda is often held up as a model for Africa in the fight against HIV and AIDS. Strong government leadership, broad-based partnerships and effective public education campaigns all contributed to a decline in the number of people living with HIV/AIDS in the 1990s But the number has tripled from 6%

Although there is a lot to learn from Uganda’s comprehensive and timely campaign against the AIDS epidemic, emphasizing Uganda’s success story must not detract us from the devastating consequences that AIDS continues to have across the country: personally, socially and economically.

There are an estimated three million people living with HIV in Uganda, which includes 300,000 children.  An estimated 65,000 people died from AIDS in 2014 and about two million children have been orphaned by Uganda's devastating epidemic.

AIDS has had a devastating impact on Uganda. It has killed approximately six million people, and significantly reduced life expectancy. AIDS has depleted the country’s labor force, reduced agricultural output and food security. It has weakened educational and health services. The large number of AIDS related deaths amongst young adults has left behind about two million orphaned children.

People living with HIV and AIDS in Uganda not only face difficulties related to treatment and management of the disease, but they also have to deal with AIDS related stigma and discrimination. Stigma and discrimination towards those infected and affected by AIDS are visible at all levels of society from families and local communities to the government. Ugandan president Gen. Yoweri Museveni himself supported the policy of dismissing or not promoting members of the armed forces who test HIV positive, and in 2006 he suggested that a rival presidential candidate Col. Dr. Kizza Besigye was unsuitable for office obecause he was allegedly infected with the virus. Discrimination has also been reported in the private sector, including mandatory HIV testing for new employees. As well as hurting those affected, such attitudes are a major hindrance to prevention and treatment efforts.

The current HIV prevalence in Uganda is estimated at about 16.4% among adults and 1.7% among children. HIV prevalence is higher in urban areas (20% prevalence) than rural areas (12%). Perhaps as a result of earlier prevention programs targeting young, single adults, the number of new HIV infections among those in monogamous relationships is now significantly higher than those with multiple partners (63 percent compared to 24 percent in 2009).

Women are disproportionately affected, accounting for 67% of all adults living with HIV. Ugandan women tend to marry and become sexually active at a younger age than their male counterparts, and often have older and more sexually experienced partners. This (plus various biological and social factors) puts young women at greater risk of infection.

The number of new infections (an estimated 222,000 in 2013) exceeds the number of annual AIDS deaths (estimate of 72,000 in 2013), and it is feared that HIV prevalence in Uganda is rapidly rising again. There are many theories as to why this is happening, including the government’s shift towards abstinence-only prevention programs, and a general complacency of ‘AIDS-fatigue’. It has been suggested that antiretroviral drugs have changed the perception of AIDS from a death sentence to a treatable, manageable disease; this has greatly reduced the fear surrounding HIV, and led to a great increase of AIDS.

 

Vocational &Technical Skills Development Project

Vocational &Technical Skills Development Project

This project has contributing to building Uganda’s human capital skills development capacity, particularly in education, agriculture and vocational and technical skills. This venture has created and responded to labor market demands and propelled productivity nationally in Uganda.

The project objectives are to fight unemployment amongst young people, improve equitable access, quality and relevance of skills training and research leading to job creation and self-employment. This is a life changing venture!

Ugandan President - Gen. Yoweri Museveni, during his latest “State of Nation Address” said that “…only 300,000 people are employed by Uganda government out of nearly 40 million people in Uganda and we do not have any vacancies anywhere in government offices. I strongly advise young people to create jobs instead of seeking for employment” charged president Museveni.

UNCEF recent report indicated that 68% of Ugandans are totally unemployed and living in abject poverty. The ABA Foundation conducted a research on how to fight the alarming levels of unemployment and poverty amongst Ugandan youths and we carried out a training needs appraisal in which young adults including University graduates, school drop-outs, widows, single mothers, and other vulnerable needy groups opted for vocational and technical skills development project.

The provision of Vocational and Technical Skills (tailoring and garment cutting, secretarial, painting, art and design, agriculture, brick laying, carpentry and joinery etc) to young adults in Uganda has not only catered for self–sustenance, but also employment which has enabled them to generate income and fight household poverty. Our biggest problem at the moment is the meager financial envelope that we operate on amidst a great number of social responsibility!

This initiative marked the beginning of what has become a fruitful and rewarding linkage between the world of industry and academia. We are contribute greatly to the development of a relevant and highly skilled workforce that can propelled productivity and national development. We shall continue to emphasize the need for a strengthened linkage with industries in order to have our skilled graduates, who are very productive to continue benefiting from the East African Community integration.

Recent research by Human Rights Watch indicated that 89% of Refugees and People staying in Internally Displaced Peoples Camps engage in prostitution which has led to an increase in HIV / AIDS scourge. These Technical and Vocational Training Centers are meant to fight the risky behavior, empower them to fight house hold Poverty and Combat the spread of HIV / AIDS.

We empower Women, Youth, Children, Widows, Refugees, and Disabled through Training programs and Capacity building. We run a Home Care Bay and Rehabilitation Centers for orphans and destitute children especially those running away from the civil war in the volatile world’s newest nation of South Sudan.

We raise Awareness in the Communities against HIV / AIDS and other Killer Diseases. We also promote Awareness among Communities by running Development Programs to Fight House Hold Poverty and Promotion of Income Generation Projects.

HIV / AIDS: IT’S KILLING AFRICA

Dear Friends,

One purpose for building families that are morally healthy is to produce physically healthy citizens. Many people live in areas where many unhealthy conditions exist. As a result, thousands of people unnecessarily die every year because some very practical principles for good health are violated.

In many situations, we create our own unhealthy environments. This is particularly true in reference to Sexually Transmitted Diseases. The most common Sexually transmitted diseases are gonorrhea, syphilis, chancroid, chlamydia, herpese, genital warts and HIV/AIDS. One becomes infected with a sexually transmitted disease through vaginal, anal, or oral sexual intercourse with an infected person. The human Sexual organs are the ideal environments for the transmission of germs that cause sexually transmitted diseases.

One of the greatest sexually transmitted diseases that have attacked the human race is HIV/AIDS. Thousands are dying every day because of AIDS. It is important that everyone take a very proactive stance to combat this against human society.


Many are saying that HIV/AIDS cannot affect them. They say they are too young, too healthy, or too cautious in their sexual relationships. The fact is; however, that AIDS shows no mercy, knows no race, no age, and no class. If you are sexually active outside the union of marriage, chances are; you will become HIV Positive, and subsequently develop AIDS. And if you have AIDS you will die. In sub-Saharan Africa, chances of becoming HIV positive are tremendously high if one is sexually active outside the union of marriage. Therefore, you must be very knowledgeable of this disease. Your life depends on it.

IDENTIFYING HIV/AIDS

The letters AIDS stands for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. AIDS is a medical diagnosis that results form a combination of illness that exists in the body because of the weakening of the body’s Immune system. HIV attacks the Immune system of the body. This makes it impossible for the body to adequately protect itself against the invasion of germs and viruses of other diseases.

HIV is a bad guy that causes AIDS. The letter HIV stands for Human Immune Deficiency Virus. HIV1 is more than one virus. HIV1 is found in most Countries of the World; whereas HIV2 is found primarily in West Africa.

HIV weakens our bodies’ ability to fight off foreign germs that invade the body. What normally happens when our bodies are invaded by germs is that the white blood cells attack the foreign invaders. However, HIV enters and destroys our white blood cells. Our Immune system is thus weakened and our body is not able to fight off invading germs. What happens next is fatal.

One’s body infected with any number of diseases. When symptom is manifested from one or more of these diseases, it is an indication that one has AIDS. One who has AIDS, therefore, dies from an invading disease.

According to research, one will not know if he or she is HIV positive without an ELISA or Western Blot blood Test. The following are some signs that show that HIV has progressed to AIDS.

PRIMARY SIGNS

i) Loss of weight that is greater than 10% of the normal body of weight.
ii) A prolonged fever is more than one month.
iii) On and off, or prolonged diarrhea for more than one month.
iv) Persistent Severe Fatigue.

MINOR SIGNS

a) Persistent cough for more than a month.
b) Itchy skin rashes.
c) Cold Sores over the body.
d) Shingle.
e) Thrush in the mouth or threat.
f) Swollen glands at two or more places throughout the body over a period of a month.

CONTRACTING HIV

HIV is passed from one person to another through body fluids – blood, semen, or vaginal secretions. HIV is primarily a Sexually transmitted disease. If you have sex with someone who is HIV Positive, chances are you will contract HIV/AIDS. In order not to become infected with HIV, you must protect yourself.

  • Having unprotected sex with one who is HIV positive spreads HIV.
  • Making contact with the blood of an infected person spreads HIV.
  • An infected mother to her unborn or newborn baby some times spreads HIV.

Most people do not know that they are infected with HIV. You cannot tell if one is infected just by looking at them. If often takes many years before HIV progresses to AIDS, and thus manifested the symptoms of the disease with which one becomes infected.

PROTECTING YOUR SELF.

Since HIV can also be transmitted during any procedure that breaks the skin by the use of instruments that come into contact with the blood system, special care should be taken in procedures such as injections and blood transfusion. HIV can be contracted if a traditional healer makes cuts with an infected knife, or a nurse gives an injection with an un sterilized needle or syringe. Intravenous drugs users often infected themselves by sharing unsterilized needles and syringes.

There are two systems of testing for HIV. They are the ELISA and Western Blot blood test. Each test detects antibodies in the blood that are fighting HIV. “They do not detect the virus itself,”. The Elisa Test is usually done first. If it is positive, the Western Blot test is performed to confirm the results.

One should wait at least three months after probable exposure to HIV before taking an HIV test. It will take approximately this amount of time before the body starts producing anti bodies against the invasion of HIV.

To make certain that one has not contracted HIV, it is advisable to take another test six months after probable exposure in order to make sure one is not HIV positive.

Keep mind that HIV tests only determine if there are antibodies in the blood that are trying to fight off HIV. If you have sex within the three to six months of the initial exposures, you could test negative because the virus you may have contracted from your most recent sexual encounter has not fully attacked your immune system; and thus there no anti bodies in your blood.

According to Dr. Dickson, the ELISA test might also be positive if the body is fighting off another disease such as malaria. “This is a false positive result”, this is why a second ELISA Test should be taken; followed by the Western Blot test.

Living with HIV/AIDS.

HIV / AIDS are a reality of our lives. The populations of many African Countries is 30% HIV Positive or higher. Thousands dies every day from HIV / AIDS related diseases. Those who are HIV Positive need help and care. You can be a great help in stopping the spread of HIV in your Community by learning as much as possible about HIV / AIDS and by abstinence in sexual activity outside the union of marriage.

If you follow the previous suggestions as to how one can protect himself or herself from HIV infection; then there should be no worry on your part about contracting HIV from an infected person. Those who are HIV positive need your care and love.

You cannot contract HIV by touching, hugging, sharing, eating utensils or coughing on the part of HIV positive person. Therefore, you should not isolate yourself form those who are HIV positive.

Here are some things you can do to have a fulfilling life and to help others live the best they can with HIV.

  • Show your concern and love by associating with a person who is HIV positive.
  • Educate yourself on how to stop the spread of HIV / AIDS and to keep yourself free of HIV.
  • Help HIV people to be positive and maintain a healthy diet and maintain a positive out look on life.
  • Maintain a good exercise program.
  • If one is sick, as a result of AIDS, encourage proper medical treatment.
  • Through counseling, encourage an HIV positive person not to have sex with others. You can be a good friend to one who is HIV positive by being there for them.

Being HIV positive does not mean one should be negative about the rest of his or her life. Living a positive life without stress is one of the primary health care principles to prolong the life of the infected person. Take care of your health. Get sufficient sleep. Seek the support of those around you.

Eating properly helps your body fight off the attack of diseases. Eating healthy food means taking drugs. Eat fresh fruits and vegetables, whole gains as sump and brown bread. Focus on God and how you can better serve Him. One of the greatest things you can do is to start a support group to help those who are HIV positive.

Through the help of friends and family; you can let it be known to others that you would like to start a discussion group comprised of both the infected and those who do not have HIV/AIDS. Let us fight stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV / AIDS. It is time for action, not reaction or resignation.

Millions of children in Sub-Saharan Africa are orphaned by HIV / AIDS. Some of these children are enslaved, cast off, oppressed, raped and abused! Many survive off the mains found out at the garbage dumps. Rev. Kiyimba Joseph is working to remedy all that. These children have no hope, no future, no way out! But together we can help and raise these orphans in love, caring, and Christian Charity.

Rev. Kiyimba Joseph himself orphaned when he was young, has a tremendous heart for the orphans, and continually seeks ways to help support orphans and destitute children in the region through The ABA Foundation.

Pure and underfiled religion before God and the Father is this:- to visit orphans and widows in their trouble; and to keep oneself unspotted from the World. James 1:27. NKJV.

God’s heart is to the orphans, widows, the poor, the outcast and the downtrodden. You alone can be God’s instrument to help support these needy vulnerable groups. Thank you so much.

ABA FOUNDATION.
www.abafoundationafrica.org
“HELPING PEOPLE LIVE BETTER LIFE”.

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ABA Foundation

The objectives of ABA Foundation is Helping People Live Better Life and to Promote the Socio - Economic Welfare of the Vulnerable Communities especially the Destitute Children, Orphans, Widows, Disaster Affected People and Poor Families affected by HIV / AIDS among others.

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